Hawaiian Paradise Urns
Funerary Urns and Artwork created on the Big Island of Hawaii

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Hawaiian Woods.



Soon we should have an extensive table of Hawaiian woods here, along with pictures of the wood for comparing the look of various species. Currently, we are preparing wood specimens for photography, and will be including the pictures as they are available.

Cook Pine
Gold Tree
Golden Shower Tree
Guava - no information available at this time
Kamani
Koa
Kou (rare)
Lychee - no information available at this time
Mango
Milo
Norfolk Pine
Pheasant Wood
Primavera
Silk Oak
Sugi


Cook Island Pine
The Cook Island Pine is a tropical pine stree. It has a "knotty pine" character. With a characteristic pine color, thse stunning trees have brilliant translucence and wonderful eyes where the branches come out of the tree. Norfolk Pine is similar and sometimes confused with Norfolk Pine.
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Guava
At this time, no information has been prepared for this wood.
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Kamani
Kamani grows near the shoreline and reaches heights of 40 - 60 feet. The tree could be up to 36 inches in diameter. The wood color is a rich, chocolate brown. The lustrous and interlocking grain is dramatic. Kamani is a hardwood and hardest to work with among the indigenous woods. In many parts of Polynesia, the kamani is a sacred tree and so it was in Hawaii. Hawaiians planted the beautiful trees with their high scented flowers near their houses.

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Koa
Koa is a large evergreen tree and was commonly used for canoes. Koa is known for its dark brown beauty, but only became popular for calabashes or bowls in the 20th Century as kou died out. Koa is a difficult wood to work with and today is primarily used for furniture. Curly koa is popular for wood items such as ukuleles since the grain is spectacular. Curly koa is rare and typically comes from the part of the tree that the main branches radiate from (crotch or fork), but can be from other stressed areas of the tree. The wood grain is stretched or compressed at the fork and produces a shimmering grain.
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Rare Kou
This evergreen tree grows along shorelines and was a wonderful shade tree near homes. At one time, Kou was the dominant tree along the shorelines of all the islands. It was from this soft but durable wood that traditional Hawaiians carved the majority of their bowls. Kou has a rich, dark brown heartwood with darker streaks. There are no discernible growth rings in the wood. The wood never cracks or checks and can be turned into any shape. Unfortunately, insects from the mainland US are killing the groves of Kou in Hawaii. Molokai has probably the largest number of living Kou trees and that is just a handful.
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Lychee
At this time, no information has been prepared for this wood.
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Mango
A large tree, the mango often reaches 65 feet in height and 3 feet in diameter. Mango is a soft hardwood. The grain is wavey and often has a pronouned curly or "fiddleback" figure. The color is lustrous blond with mottled color variations.
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Milo
Milo is a dark, rich chocolate colored wood,although the wood color can be peach colored. It all depends on how much salt water, the shore-loving milo tree gets. Milo is usually found only at lower elevations. Molokai has a plentiful supply of milo as much of its shoreline has yet to be developed. Milo became the replacement wood for calabashes or bowls when Kou started to die out in the mid 1800s.
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Norfolk Pine
The Norfolk Pine is a tropical pine stree. It has a "knotty pine" character. With a characteristic pine color, thse stunning trees have brilliant translucence and wonderful eyes where the branches come out of the tree. Cook Pine is similar and sometimes confused with Norfolk Pine.
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Pheasant Wood or Golden Shower Tree
This decorative tree is normally found in yards. Its distinctive yellow flowers makes this a beautiful but large yard tree. The wood's grain, when cut, looks like feathers and hence the name pheasant wood. The wood is a golden brown and makes distinctive bowls and jewelry.
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Primavera or Gold Tree
This tree is a flowering tree growing over 60 feet in height and 3 feet in diamter. The wood, similar to satinwood, is light yellow and fairly strong. The grain may be wavy.
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Silk Oak
This tree was introduced for shade, ornament, and reforestation. It may reach 70 feet in height with a diamter of up to 3 feet. Sometimes this wood is called lace wood. The color of wood is pinkish brown and finishes up to a lustrous golden color. The tree grows up to the 4000 foot level.
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Sugi
This tree is a type of cedar with cedar's characteristic aroma. The wood color ranges in color in white and yellow with a reddish brown heartwood.
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